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The big burn : Teddy Roosevelt and the fire that saved America Preview this item
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The big burn : Teddy Roosevelt and the fire that saved America

Author: Timothy Egan
Publisher: Boston : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2009.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
On the afternoon of August 20, 1910, a battering ram of wind moved through the drought-stricken national forests of Washington, Idaho, and Montana, whipping the hundreds of small blazes burning across the forest floor into a roaring inferno that jumped from treetop to ridge as it raged, destroying towns and timber in the blink of an eye. Forest rangers had assembled nearly ten thousand men -- college boys, day  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Biography
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Egan, Timothy.
Big burn.
Boston : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2009
(OCoLC)795645360
Named Person: Theodore Roosevelt; Gifford Pinchot
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Timothy Egan
ISBN: 9780618968411 0618968415
OCLC Number: 313658042
Description: x, 324 pages, [8] pages of plates : illustrations, map ; 24 cm
Contents: Prologue: A fire at the end of the world --
Part I. In on the creation. "A peculiar intimacy" ; Roost of the robber barons ; The Great Crusade ; Deadwood days ; Showdown --
Part II. What they lost. Summer of smoke ; Men, men, men! ; Spaghetti Westerners ; Firestorm's eve ; Blowup ; The lost day ; The lost night ; Towns afire ; To save a town ; The missing ; The living and the dead --
Part III. What they saved. Fallout ; One for the boys ; Ashes.
Responsibility: Timothy Egan.

Abstract:

On the afternoon of August 20, 1910, a battering ram of wind moved through the drought-stricken national forests of Washington, Idaho, and Montana, whipping the hundreds of small blazes burning across the forest floor into a roaring inferno that jumped from treetop to ridge as it raged, destroying towns and timber in the blink of an eye. Forest rangers had assembled nearly ten thousand men -- college boys, day workers, immigrants from mining camps -- to fight the fire. But no living person had seen anything like those flames, and neither the rangers nor anyone else knew how to subdue them. Equally dramatic is the larger story of outsized president Teddy Roosevelt and his chief forester, Gifford Pinchot. Pioneering the notion of conservation, Roosevelt and Pinchot did nothing less than create the idea of public land as our national treasure, owned by and preserved for every citizen. The robber barons fought Roosevelt and Pinchot's rangers, but the Big Burn saved the forests even as it destroyed them: the heroism shown by the rangers turned public opinion permanently in their favor and became the creation myth that drove the Forest Service, with consequences still felt in the way our national lands are protected -- or not -- today.
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